Lakeland International Camp 1966

Wray Castle, Windermere 1966

Lancaster Guardian August 1966

Scouts meet Chief at international camp

(by Woodsmoke)

ABOUT 52 Scouts with seven Scouters from the 1st. Slyne-with-Hest and the 16th. Morecambe and Heysham Groups went off on Monday (July 25) to the International Scout Camp at Wray Castle on the shores of Windermere.

This had been organised by Scouts of the North West and Scouts from Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Holland. Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Portugal, Sweden and the U.S.A., joined to make a gathering of some 700 boys.

On arrival Scouts from the various centres joined the English Groups and were taken. with their patrols. This is part of Scout tradition and mentality that you make your guests welcome. They all joined together to do the various camp chores, cleaning dixies, bringing water, chopping wood and keeping the camp tidy.

On Wednesday (July 27) the Chief Scout. Sir Charles MacLean, attended the camp and to meet him, a coach load of Cubs from the Association went for the day. Needless to say, he shook hands with every Scout and Cub, even turning back to greet one of the younger cubs who, realising that his hands were dirty, had turned away to dean them on the grass, and who otherwise would have been missed by his Chief.

Whole camp

Patrols from the whole camp were invited to take part in a Challenge Competition and seven Senior Scouts from the 16th. Morecambe and Heysham Group formed themselves into a patrol. They had to work hard, show intelligence, have thought for others – as the list of activities shows: the boys had to do ‘services’ to the camp as a whole, In ‘Brotherhood.’ they had to look after and entertain another patrol, they partook in an ‘expedition’ – which was more than just a competition for they found themselves trudging the fells in the mist assisting a search for a missing doctor, but without success.

They had to show ‘strlcka­bililty’ (sic) – they tried their hand at all the various activities. Their camp had to be neat and tidy and their ‘gadgets’ had to be useful and not just ornamental. In ‘observation’ they had to be wide awake and this caused some amusement as they had to identify the “World Badge Agents” by secret signs. On the ‘assault course’ they tackled an aerial ropeway, crossed ravines on single ropes by a dead man’s crawl, they traversed the monkey bridge, climbed up rope ladders and negotiated a queer raft suspended in mid-air.

The Group made a most interesting collection of various national dress. In ‘miscellaneous scouting’ they pitched tents, did first aid, made knots and lashings. For ‘orienteering’ they were given six map references and had to decide on the quickest route over about six miles and were tried over it.

Mike Selway & Michael Howarth with the World flag

The first 100 Scouts were presented with World Scout Badges, but the 16th. Morecambe and Heysham Group also, gained the winner’s prizes – World Scout woggles (the knot which fastens a Scout’s kerchief neatly under the throat) and were further presented with a World Flag. This will be most proudly flown at all future camps of the Group.

The Scouts returned to Morecambe and Slyne on Friday (August 5) bringing back with them as their guests for a long weekend, scouts from France, Germany, and Austria – Marc De Rycke from St. Cloud, Paris; Karl George Wolf from Bad Godesburg, Germany, and later on “Heinz” with Wolfgang Schiller from Vienna, Austria, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks (16th.) Bertrand Goblet was with Alan Kelsall, Jean Marie Franchomme with Colin Midwinter, Christian Jou with Bob Sharrock and Jean Claude Vagneaux with Martin Lambert. They were shown around Morecambe and Heysham and we trust they enjoyed their stay.

The Association gave a barbecue for the French, German, and Austrian boys at the Silverhelme Camp site on Monday (August 8) when a camp fire was organised and many songs were sung.

Here are some of my photos – click on any image for a larger photo.